Choosing the best energy saving lightbulbs – Converting Lumens to Watts

converting lumens to watts understanding the difference on energy saving lightbulbs and LED lighting

This short guide will help  you understand the difference between lumens and Watts.

converting lumens to watts understanding the difference on energy saving lightbulbs and LED lighting
converting lumens to watts understanding the difference on energy saving lightbulbs and LED lighting

The term lumens defines a measurement of light. Lumens is a standardised international standard for measuring light being emitted by any source.  One lumen is the amount of light emitted in a solid angle of 1 sr, from a source that radiates to an equal extent in all directions and whose intensity is 1 cd.

The term Watt is the international standard for measuring power ( energy per unit time)

Lightbulbs were traditionally rated by the amount of power they consumed, the higher the number on the box, the greater the light produced by the lightbulb. The same logic applies with lumens but the numbers are far greater. If you were to buy a 100 lumen LED lighting solution, you would have a light source equivalent to a candle, however a 100 watt lightbulb would illuminate a huge room brightly. To achieve the same lighting using LED lumen measurements you would need around 1600-2000 lumens.

Conversion table

The problems in translating the difference between lumens and watts arises when trying to convert watts to lumens or vice versa. This is because the two measurements are completely different. One is measuring the power consumed the other is measuring energy being produced and on a completely different scale.

 

We hope this helps you choose the most suitable LED Lighting system for your home.

3 thoughts on “Choosing the best energy saving lightbulbs – Converting Lumens to Watts

  1. I bought a pagkace of these General Electric appliance bulbs to use in the light in an overhead range hood. These are supposed to be usable in an oven, so the heat in the hood would be far less.Two of these bulbs burned out in less than six months of very limited use. (I don’t spend a lot of time in the kitchen. I avoid it whenever possible.) I have experienced premature burn-out with other GE bulbs as well.GE light bulbs suffer from premature burn-out and should be avoided.

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  2. I bought one of these and two of the Philips L Prize bulbs. This bulb is awmesoe and looks great, but behind a standard shade, I would recommend the L Prize over this by far. It’s brighter while at the same time being lower wattage, and the light quality seems slightly better, perhaps because it uses three different LED colors behind the phosphor lens shell (though the Switch60 is still far and away better than a CFL). I still plan to get a Switch100 when they become available though.

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